Death of a Pirate: British Radio and the Making of the Information Age

Death of a Pirate: British Radio and the Making of the Information Age

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a€œA superb account of the rise of modern broadcasting.a€ a€”Financial Times When the pirate operator Oliver Smedley shot and killed his rival Reg Calvert in Smedleya€™s country cottage on June 21, 1966, it was a turning point for the outlaw radio stations dotting the coastal waters of England. Situated on ships and offshore forts like Shivering Sands, these stations blasted away at the high-minded BBCa€™s broadcast monopoly with the new beats of the Stones and DJs like Screaming Lord Sutch. For free-market ideologues like Smedley, the pirate stations were entrepreneurial efforts to undermine the growing British welfare state as embodied by the BBC. The worlds of high table and underground collide in this riveting history.At any rate, if Radio City was not attuned to the Krays, the Krays were attuned to Radio City. ... The chosen victim was a nightclub owner named George Caruana. ... At a pub in Bethnal Green, Cooper introduced Ronnie to an expert radio engineer who could be the hit man. ... (including a divera#39;s speargun and a hunting crossbow), the idea was that he would detonate a car bomb under Caruanaa#39;s Mini.


Title:Death of a Pirate: British Radio and the Making of the Information Age
Author:Adrian Johns
Publisher:W. W. Norton & Company - 2010-11-08
ISBN-13:

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